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Bed and breakfast accommodation in Canterbury Monasteries

• Unique and peaceful Monastery stays like no other

• Enjoy one of a kind guest accommodation in some of the most historic and beautiful buildings in Canterbury on the doorstep of some of United Kingdom's most renowned tourist attractions.

• Monasteries.com provides a unique opportunity for anyone to stay in beautiful Monastery accommodation across Canterbury and the surrounding area, the perfect base for a peaceful, relaxing retreat.

Canterbury Visitor information

Besides being one of Britain’s Heritage cities, Canterbury is also a cultural and entertainment destination.

Must-dos include visiting The Canterbury Tales, with its re-creation of the sights, sounds, and smells of Chaucer's medieval England; stopping in at the Canterbury Roman Museum, a fascinating look into the city's Roman roots; and taking a historic river tour on the Stour.

England’s largest surviving medieval gateway with spectacular views of the city of Canterbury from the battlements viewpoint. The Westgate towers  is the largest surviving medieval gate in England and visitors can still enter the  city  through its arch as they have done since the mid 1380s. 

Travel

Visitors to Canterbury will find getting around very easy.  The city is very compact and walkable, and much of the city centre is pedestrianised. The centre can be crossed in just a 10-15 mins walk. 

If you are travelling outside of town, there are frequent buses run by Stagecoach, with many different routes to get to areas outside of Canterbury. 

If you fly, Canterbury does not have its own airport. It is therefore best to fly to London Heathrow (LHR) Airport, which is 67.8 miles away from Canterbury. The train and subway from London Heathrow (LHR) to Canterbury takes 2h 12m.

History of Canterbury

Canterbury is a historic English cathedral city, the cultural heritage city is boasting three UNESCO World Heritage Sites - Canterbury Cathedral, the Church of St Martin, and the ruins of St Augustine's Abbey.

Canterbury Cathedral is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England. The imposing cathedral building, set in beautiful gardens, has been a place of worship for more than 1,400 years. The site has got one of England’s largest collections of early medieval stained glass. Stand on the exact spot where, in 1170, Archbishop Thomas Becket was murdered in the Cathedral, making the site one of Europe’s most important pilgrimage centres. You will also find the shrine of King Henry IV and his Queen, Joan of Navarre in the cathedral Trinity Chapel. The cathedral is also famous as part of the Pilgrim's Way, a route for pilgrimages from Winchester and Rochester.

St Augustine's Abbey was originally created as a burial place for the Anglo-Saxon kings of Kent and at its height in the Middle Ages, it was one of the most significant religious houses in Northern Europe. For a truly immersive experience, visitors can now see the abbey as it would have appeared in the early 1500s as virtual reality headsets 'walk' you through parts of the 16th-century monastery.

St Martin's Church is the oldest parish church still in use. It started as the private chapel of Christian Queen Bertha of Kent in the 6th century before Augustine arrived from Rome. In 597AD St Augustine and his companions worshipped at the church until King Ethelbert granted him the land for the world-famous abbey and cathedral.

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