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Bed and breakfast accommodation in Ancona Monasteries

• Unique and peaceful Monastery stays like no other

• Enjoy one of a kind guest accommodation in some of the most historic and beautiful buildings in Ancona on the doorstep of some of Italy's most renowned tourist attractions.

• Monasteries.com provides a unique opportunity for anyone to stay in beautiful Monastery accommodation across Ancona and the surrounding area, the perfect base for a peaceful, relaxing retreat.

Ancona Visitor information

For most travellers, Ancona, capital of the Marche region, is somewhere to pass through, a major ferry port on the way to Greece and a rail and bus hub if you’re heading south. Ancona perhaps deserves a better reputation; the setting is beautiful, there’s a picturesque old town spilling down a hill that’s topped by an ancient cathedral, there are Romanesque churches and Renaissance palazzi, wide boulevards and lovely parks shaded by pine trees. An easy hop outside the city lies a string of pebbly beaches, some backed by pine trees and many with great fish restaurants. Back in town, the main sights include San Ciriaco, an 11th – 13th century Romanesque Gothic building topped by an impressive dome, an art gallery and archeological museum, the huge pentagonal fortress known as the Mole Vanvitelliana and the Roman arch and amphitheatre. Spend time too, wandering streets such as via della Loggia, with its venetian Loggia dei Mercanti, or enjoying street life from a café table in Piazza del Plebiscito.

History of Ancona

Probably founded by the Greeks, Ancona was an important Roman town, which following the fall of Rome became part of the eastern empire, and thus a Byzantine city. It was Byzantium’s main port and a target for repeated Saracen attack. Its strength grew and the city became a maritime republic, tolerant towards other religions; there were both Greek Orthodox  and Jewish colonies in the city, and there are still two synagogues and two Jewish cemeteries. 

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