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Bed and breakfast accommodation in Swansea Monasteries

• Unique and peaceful Monastery stays like no other

• Enjoy one of a kind guest accommodation in some of the most historic and beautiful buildings in Swansea on the doorstep of some of United Kingdom's most renowned tourist attractions.

• Monasteries.com provides a unique opportunity for anyone to stay in beautiful Monastery accommodation across Swansea and the surrounding area, the perfect base for a peaceful, relaxing retreat.

Swansea Visitor information

Swansea, the coastal town is known as "Abertawe" in Welsh, and its suburbs extend as far as the scenic Gower Peninsula. 

The coast is formed by a limestone massif of great scenic beauty, the area has been classified of Outstanding Natural Beauty and is a nature reserve that is only accessible on foot. One of the most beautiful will be the Three Cliffs Bay. Many beaches offer different sport activities which is perfect for anyone who likes adventures. 

Swansea’s indoor market has been going since the 1700s, it is the perfect place to find local products such as Welsh cheese, mussels or laverbread made from seaweed. It is home to over a hundred stalls of clothes, jewelry and food. 

Another striking architectural landmark such as the The National Waterfront Museum should be on your list, as the museum celebrates the industrial and maritime history of Wales dating back to the 1800s. This is an interactive guide through the Welsch development as it display include maritime, transport, technology and retail artefacts.

Travel 

It is easy to walk around Swansea, and even easier to travel sustainably to and around Swansea Bay using the excellent public transport network, cycle trails and walks.

Fast and frequent train services link all regions of the UK to Swansea Bay either direct or with one easy interchange. Direct trains run from London Paddington, Bristol Parkway, Cardiff, Newport, Hereford, Shrewsbury, Crewe and Manchester to the Swansea Bay area, and there are good connections from the Midlands, north-east, south, and south west England at Bristol Parkway. 

There are frequent coach services to Swansea Bay from all regions of the UK, either direct or with one easy interchange. The main companies will be National Express, Megabus and First Cymru X10. When arrived in Swansea, some local bus services leave from stops adjacent to the coach station at Swansea for all parts of the city and region including Gower and Mumbles.

For travellers arriving by air, there are fast railway and airport links to Swansea Bay from London (Gatwick and Heathrow), or even Bristol and Cardiff International Airports.

History of Swansea

Swansea is a coastal city in southwest Wales, and the second largest city of Wales. Swansea, like Wales in general, has seen many Non-conformist religious revivals. In 1904, Evan Roberts, a miner from Loughor, just outside Swansea, was the leader of what has been called one of the world's greatest Protestant religious revivals. Within a few months about 100,000 people were converted. When Non-conformism exploded in the 19th century, the preachers were amassing huge crowds from the Christian community.The gorgeous religious buildings remain and are today part of Swansea’s proud heritage.  

From the Caldey Island inhabited by monks, to the ashram, to the beautiful Welsh churches. West Wales is home to many historic buildings to wander around, such as the Tabernacl, one of the largest and most expensive chapels built in Wales. The religious site has eight huge Corinthian columns and arches, and a magnificent spire, Tabernacle is an unmistakable building in the lower Swansea valley.

Not too far from Swansea, you can visit the peninsula’s largest medieval church, St Cenydd’s, which dominates the small village of Llangennith. The medieval church was built on the site of a 6th century churchyard, you will find the remains of a medieval doorway to the cloisters of the adjoining priory, and in the rear of the chancel arch is a rood-stair. Part of the Gower Church trail it offers panorama views overlooking Broughton Bay. 

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