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Bed and breakfast accommodation in Cork Monasteries

• Unique and peaceful Monastery stays like no other

• Enjoy one of a kind guest accommodation in some of the most historic and beautiful buildings in Cork on the doorstep of some of Ireland's most renowned tourist attractions.

• Monasteries.com provides a unique opportunity for anyone to stay in beautiful Monastery accommodation across Cork and the surrounding area, the perfect base for a peaceful, relaxing retreat.

Cork Visitor information

Cork is a vibrant city, with a welcoming vibe. 

Cork was once an entirely walled city – with fortified gates at what are now known as North and South Gate Bridges – though only small sections of the original fortifications still exist. A section of the city wall dating from the 17th century was discovered, along with artefacts from the period, now on display at Cork Public Museum.

In the heart of Cork City and with an eye-catching fountain at its center, this quirky roofed food market has been trading since 1788. Artisan breads, fruit, and freshly caught seafood are just some of the specialities on offer. It’s the oldest market of its kind in Europe and even holds the Royal Seal of Approval, which was granted in 2011 when Queen Elizabeth II was invited  to walk around its artisan stalls.

Not far from St. Anne's is another one of Cork city's attractions, the atmospheric and historic City Gaol, which opened in 1824 and closed in 1923. Originally the prison housed both male and female prisoners who committed crimes within the city's borders. The complex has been restored and opened to the public since 1993. 

Don’t miss out on the Guinness Cork Jazz Festival hosting each year in October, hundreds of jazz musicians and thousands of music fans from all over the world. Showcasing the best of Irish and overseas musicians in an eclectic four-day programme of jazz and jazz-inspired music in over 70 venues citywide.

Travel

Because of the limited parking, the best way to see Cork is on foot, but don't try to do it all in a day. The central part of the city can easily take a day to explore. 

However the city put to use « Bike Share » which is rental bikes that will enable you to explore the city quicker and easier. 

The city also offers a great bus network from Parnell Place Bus Station to all parts of the city, its suburbs, and nearby towns.

The easiest way to travel around Cork is by car or motorbike. You'll have the freedom to not just see the main attractions but also get off the 'beaten track' and discover hidden gems. But if you stay in town, make sure to have a car park available during your stay. 

History of Cork

Cork is located on Ireland’s south coast.

Cork began as a monastic settlement in the 6th century, founded by St Finbarr. The arrival of Christianity was an important event in Ireland’s history which had a profound and long-lasting impact. Circa 600 AD he established a Christian monastery, now marked by the site of present day St Fin Barre ‘s Cathedral. The Neo-Gothic cathedral designed by William Bruges contains 1.260 sculptures and includes stained glass windows depicting the Old and New Testaments. 

Across the River Lee on the north side of the city, St. Anne's Church is one of the oldest churches in the city built in 1722 still in use. With its spectacular bell tower, you can climb the 132 steps to see out over the city with its 360 degree view at 36.65m/120ft there is an awe inspiring beauty to be had. With its distinctive Italian architecture, St. Anne's Church is one of Cork's most iconic landmarks. 

Another National Monument is the Red Abbey from a former 14th-century Augustinian abbey. It was occupied by friars for three centuries. When the friars established a new friary , the Red Abbey was turned into a sugar refinery. However a fire from the refinery tore through the abbey and destroyed most of the abbey’s structure in 1799. The bell tower and of the Abbey are the only remains of the structure and has been designated as a national monument. 

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